Angry Wind

Angry Wind

Through Muslim Black Africa by Truck, Bus, Boat, and Camel

eBook - 2013
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Hailed by Bill Bryson and the New York Times Book Review as a rising star among travel writers, Jeffrey Tayler penetrates one of the most isolated, forbidding regions on earth--the Sahel. This lower expanse of the Sahara, which marks the southern limit of Islam's reach in West and Central Africa, boasts such mythologized places as Mopti and Timbuktu, as well as Africa's poorest countries, Chad and Niger. In parts of the Sahel, hard-line Sharia law rules and slaves are still traded. Racked by lethal harmattan winds, chronic civil wars, and grim Islamic fundamentalism, it is not the ideal place for a traveler with a U.S. passport. Tayler finds genuine danger in many guises, from drunken soldiers to a thieving teenage mob. But he also encounters patience and generosity of a sort found only in Africa.
Traveling overland by the same rickety means used by the local people--tottering, overfilled buses, bush taxis with holes in the floor, disgruntled camels--he uses his fluency in French and Arabic (the region's lingua francas) to connect with them. Tayler is able to illuminate the roiling, enigmatic cultures of the Sahel as no other Western writer could.
Publisher: [United States] :, Houghton Mifflin Harcourt,, 2013.
ISBN: 9780547523798
0547523793
Branch Call Number: eBook hoopla
Characteristics: 1 online resource
text file,rda
Additional Contributors: hoopla digital
Restrictions on Access: Digital content provided by hoopla.

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Yavin
Mar 21, 2017

An excellent book about one man's journey through the Sahel (a region just south of the Sahara in western Africa). Follow as Jeffrey Tayler travels through Chad, Nigeria, Niger, Mali and Senegal. Taking place in the winter of 2002/2003, you get to hear from the people of Africa their thoughts on Islam, Christianity, foreign aid, the war on terror, tradition vs progress and much more. One of the best best books I've read thus far on Africa, it's a relatively easy read and I at least flew through it. It didn't seem to lag and become laborious for me anywhere in the book. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in Africa, foreign views of America or just plain anyone who has a desire to travel.

l
lebaudroy
Dec 08, 2015

Travel the Sahel through Tayler's eyes. This writer's keen sense of observation will put you in the middle of the desert and leave you breathless before a land filled with extraordinary people and places. Hard reading at times, the Sahel is a very poor place and Tayler pulls no punches, but a travelogue of profound insight.

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